15+ Useful Words For Body Parts In Korean

Original blog post: https://ling-app.com/ko/body-parts-in-korean/

Talking about Korean body parts or 몸 (Mom) is interesting. When pointing out specific body parts during your conversation, learning the common words used by the locals will seriously help you out. Let’s learn more about this below.

Are you flying to South Korea and planning to buy clothes, cosmetics, and other accessories? Well, you’ll have to learn Korean body parts. If you are also in medicine, fitness, beauty, and fashion, learning body parts in Korean will come in handy.

This blog will help you learn the basic human body parts in Korean for free. If you’re still not familiar with the Korean alphabet, don’t worry because every Korean word has a romanization/pronunciation and an English translation. If you also want to start learning Korean as part of your daily life, you can learn with Ling App.

Human Body Parts In Korean

Our body parts and features are what makes every one of us unique. It is a gift that we should take care of and never take for granted. We always make sure that the important body parts are always in shape and healthy. Sometimes, we tend to improve our bodies, whether external or internal. Keeping these different body parts healthy is the best way to take care of this gift.

Being one of the countries in the world with a large cosmetic and skincare industry plus the influence of the K-pop and K-drama industries, it’s impossible not to pay attention to your physical appearance. In South Korea, having desirable physical body parts is really in demand. In fact, they have strict beauty standards which force some people to improve specific parts of the body through cosmetics and cosmetic procedures.

It’s not enough to maintain an excellent physical appearance. You also have to take care of your internal body parts. One of the Korean beauty standards is having a slim body. It might make us wonder if they are healthy. If you look into their diet, you’ll see it’s rich in vegetable dishes, seafood, and fermented dishes, which are beneficial. They also enjoy eating homemade food rather than processed food. They love to walk, and they have an active lifestyle which is important in maintaining our body parts healthy.

Since the human body is vital for Koreans, let us learn some vocabulary related to body parts in Korean.

몸 (Mom) — Body

The first essential vocabulary related to body parts in Korean that you should learn is the word “body.” The Korean word — 몸 (Mom) means body in Korean parts. Now that you know this let us learn Korean body parts. Each body part that you will discover comes with pronunciation to helo you read Korean. There is also an English translation to help you understand the meaning of each vocabulary.

1. Head — 머리 (Meori)

Let us begin talking about body parts in Korean by learning how to say “head.” In Korean, the word 머리 (Meori) can mean both “head” and “hair.” But if you want to distinguish these two body parts, you can use 머리카락 (meorikarak) for “hair.”

2. Hair — 머리 / 머리카락 Meo-ri / Meo-ri-ka-rak

Both Korean men and women do not cut their hair during the Joseon period. This is not because they just don’t want to but because they are prohibited from cutting their hair. They believed that it was a legacy passed by their parents, so they had to preserve it and pass it to the next generation.

3. Face — 얼굴 (Eolgul)

Koreans prefer having a small face. This is one of the Korean beauty standards up until today. This is why many Koreans, especially celebrities and idols, undergo different procedures to make their faces look smaller.

Koreans are also fond of using different skincare products to maintain a young-looking face. Being one of the largest skincare industries globally, South Korea has a lot of skincare products like creams, cleansers, mists, essences, and serum. They also have skincare routines to achieve a dewy, youthful look.

4. Eye- 눈 (Nun)

The eyes play a role in Korean beauty standards. Koreans prefer big and glowing eyes. There are different procedures to make their eyes look bigger, youthful, and cheerful, like inserting “charming fat,” a pocket fat found directly under the eye. They also use makeup products like eyeshadows and eyeliners to make their eyes look alive. When their eyes look tired, they use eye creams and eye patches to bring back the glow on their eyes.

5. Eyebrows — 눈썹 (Nunsseop)

Koreans prefer short and straight eyebrows 눈썹 (Nunsseop). This is part of achieving an innocent youthful look that Koreans want to achieve. If your eyebrows are naturally thin, you can improve using eyebrow pencils, powder, or gel. The eyebrows should have a significant distance from the eyes. There is also this thing called organic microblading, which is believed to be the future of the Korean beauty industry.

6. Eyelashes — 속눈썹 (Songnunsseop)

Korean beauty is more natural and youthful-looking, so having long and thick eyelashes like the Westerns does not go along with the Korean beauty standards. Since Koreans are naturally born with thin eyelashes, they usually use mascara and false eyelashes. But, for a more long-lasting eyelash, some prefer to have eyelash extensions that will for at least a long time.

7. Eyelid — 눈꺼풀 (Nunkkeopul)

Koreans are naturally born with a monolid. But, part of the Korean beauty standards has double eyelids, so many Koreans use makeup or even undergo double eyelid surgery to achieve this look.

8. Forehead — 이마 (Ima)

Even if Koreans prefer slim faces, their facial features may still look bland because of the lack of volume. This is where they use Forehead Implant Procedure. The Korean beauty standard is stringent. The face should be symmetrical to be considered beautiful, and one of the procedures to achieve this is through Forehead Implant Procedure. It is a procedure that provides personalized prosthetics for one’s forehead, chin, and smile line parts.

9. Nose — 코 (Ko)

Another important body part in Korean beauty standards is the nose. Koreans prefer a small, pointy, and high-bridged nose. To achieve this, they usually undergo a noselift procedure. If you don’t want to undergo this procedure, you can always contour your nose to make it look smaller.

10. Ear -귀 (Gwi)

The next body part in Korea to learn is 귀 (Gwi) or ear in English. The most popular way to style your ear is through the piercing. Koreans nowadays also do multiple piercings, especially for women, to look attractive. But, what’s interesting is that ear piercing in Korea is not just for women. It’s also for men. Some male K-pop idols with ear piercings are BIGBANG’s G-Dragon, BTS’Jungkook, and NCT’s Ten.

11. Cheek — 볼 (Bol) | 뺨 (Ppyam)

In Korean beauty, putting a generous amount of blush resulting in a drunken, sun-kissed look is considered desirable. This is why instead of having pointed and high cheeks, they prefer to have round cheeks. Some of them undergo fat injections just to achieve this look.

12. Mouth -입 (Ip)

Aside from having a small face, a small mouth is also considered beautiful in Korea. In addition to this, the smile line of your mouth should be pointed upward when you smile.

13. Lips — 입술 (Ibsul)

The lips are one of the most important body parts in Korean that you should learn. In Korean beauty standards, lips should be heart-shaped and plump, but the lower lip should be plumper than the upper one. Having a well-hydrated lip is also important to Korean beauty. To do this, you can use different products like lip balms and lip moisturizers, but of course, the best way to hydrate your lips is by drinking lots of water. It’s safe, healthy, and incredibly cheap.

14. Teeth — 이 (I) | 치아 (Chia)

Having a white and aligned tooth is also considered desirable in South Korea. This is why most Koreans wear braces when they are young.

15. Chin — 턱 (Teok)

Another way to fit in the Korean beauty standards has a v-shaped jaw, so having a bit pointy chin is considered desirable for Koreans.

Upper Body Parts

After learning the different parts found in the face, let us now learn the upper body parts in Korean.

Lower Body Parts

Now, here are the lower body parts in Korean.

Other Human Body Parts In Korean

Widen your vocabulary about different body parts in Korean with these additional words.

Most Common Korean Words Related To Body Parts

Master The Korean Language With Ling App!

Do you know how to read the Korean alphabet? How many words in the Korean language do you know? If you’re still a beginner and interested to learn more, then Ling App is the perfect app for you. You can either visit the website or download the app to start a fun but a meaningful language learning experience. You’ll enjoy each lesson you’ll pick because it is in smart flashcards with mini-games, quizzes, translations, audio recordings for pronunciation, and images.

If you’re worried about developing your language skills, Ling App has impressive features for that, such as the spaced repetition system, chatbots, grammar explanations, and dialogues. So, grab your phone and start your fantastic journey in learning Korean with Ling App.

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